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Documents released in officer-involved shooting

By Kevin Lessard, KCFW Reporter, klessard@kcfw.com
Published On: Dec 18 2013 07:08:48 PM MST
Updated On: Dec 18 2013 08:24:33 PM MST
KALISPELL, Mont. -

Michelle Gentry allegedly screamed "Do it, do it now" at SWAT team members the night a SWAT team incident at her residence ended with her being shot twice.

"No deputy, no police officer, nobody in law enforcement wants to have to utilize any sort of deadly force.  It's always a last resort and a last option and used only to protect yourself or someone else from imminent death or serious harm," said Flathead County Sheriff Chuck Curry.

That's exactly why that last option was used.

According to the report released by the Flathead County Attorney's Office, Deputy Caleb Pleasants felt "like I was looking down the barrel of the gun, I thought I was going to get shot.”

When Pleasants began firing his AR-15, the shots he fired missed, making Pleasants believe the gun was malfunctioning.

He then looked up again and saw Gentry closer. Fearing death or serious bodily injury he fired again, hitting Gentry twice.

While Pleasants thought at the time the gun was malfunctioning, Curry says it wasn't. He says it was because Gentry was close to the deputy.

"He did come off target at one point to check that because he thought there may be, but it actually had to do with the sight angle of the optics mounted on the weapons versus the barrel and the proximity to the vehicle that he was behind," Curry said.

Also stated in the report was that Pleasants was briefed that there was a suicidal woman with a weapon and made threats to use it, but he did not know her intentions of forcing law enforcement to shoot her if they arrived.

After the investigation by the Kalispell Police Department, it was determined that Pleasants was justified in shooting Gentry.

If she is convicted of assault on a police officer, she could face up to 10 years in prison, and up to $50,000 in fines.