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Documents unsealed in Graham case

By Scott Zoltan, KECI Reporter, szoltan@keci.com
Published On: Nov 02 2013 07:18:06 PM MDT
MISSOULA, Mont. -

A federal judge has unsealed court documents that provide further detail in the case prosecutors are building against a Kalispell newlywed accused of pushing her husband off a cliff.

Jordan Graham, 22, is charged with murder, accused of killing her husband 25-year old Cody Johnson on July 7 in Glacier National Park. She has pled not guilty, and her trial is set for December 9.

Written statements made in efforts to obtain search warrants for Graham’s social media pages, phone and email account are now unsealed. Assistant US Attorney Zeno Baucus had requested the release not happen, arguing that it might taint a pool of potential jurors.

The documents say a friend of the couple told investigators that Graham was planning on confronting Cody with doubts about their marriage, but she later texted the friend that “all it did was cause me to get scratched and him to leave.” One text reportedly said “Dude I’m freaking out. I’m about to go for a walk or something. Jump off a fricking bridge. Idk I’ve lost it.”

The documents also detail an alleged email traced to an i.p. address issued to Jordan’s dad’s house, where she had been living. Graham had reportedly brought the email to the attention of authorities, and it was purportedly sent by someone named “Tony,” after seeing one of Jordan’s twitter posts about Cody being missing. It said, according to court documents, that Cody had gone for a joy ride with friends and that “Cody got out of the car and went for a little hike and they are positive he fell and he is dead Jordan. I don’t know who the guys were but they took off. So call off the missing person report. Cody is gone for sure – Tony.”

Clint van Zandt, a former FBI agent, tells NBC Montana that investigators are increasingly utilizing social media and internet technology .

“I think in the last 20 -25 years it has become natural to use social media. Investigators have found that so many people are so quick to say things on social media, things that one can never take back,” said van Zandt.