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Gun control group gets ready to endorse candidates

By By Kevin Bohn CNN Senior Producer
Published On: Jul 06 2014 09:57:24 PM MDT
Updated On: Jul 07 2014 05:00:53 AM MDT
Man looks at Smith and Wesson guns

REUTERS/Regis Duvignau

WASHINGTON (CNN) -

The gun control group formed by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg on Monday will release a questionnaire it is going to ask federal candidates to fill out as it decides which ones to support in this year's mid-term elections.

Bloomberg in April pledged to spend $50 million this election year to help support candidates who will back further gun control efforts and to combat the politically powerful National Rifle Association.

Among the issues his group, Everytown for Gun Safety, will ask candidates includes one of its priorities: closing the so-called gun show loophole where not everyone who buys a gun at a show must undergo a background check. Other issues it asks about include tightening possession restrictions on domestic abusers, prosecuting gun traffickers and preventing access by children to guns, according to a copy of the questionnaire obtained in advance by CNN.

"We are working to support candidates who will vote for common-sense laws to reduce gun violence. Using this questionnaire and the candidate's past history on gun issues, we will make determinations that will help Gun Sense Voters decide where candidates stand," reads part of the questionnaire's introduction. It adds "opposing a gun safety policy in this questionnaire will not necessarily be considered a statement against gun sense" so the group says it will take into account an explanation of candidates' positions.

Group officials said the questionnaire is part of their Gun Sense Voter Campaign, which is trying to mobilize one million Americans to vote in the mid-terms for those candidates who pledge to support gun safety measures. They say so far more than 650,000 have signed.

While polls have shown a majority of Americans support stricter background checks, the Senate last year failed to pass that as well as other measures despite the emotional fallout from the Newtown, Connecticut, school shooting and a strong push for the measures from the White House.

The Washington Post first reported Everytown's candidate questionnaire.